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Changing glossy neck finish satin

I'm one of those players who don't like the stickyness of glossy necks. This can easily be cured, by breaking the surface of the paint. Sandpaper would remove the paint, but Scotch-Brite just roughens the surface, resulting in a satin-like finish. Here's how…
IamMark
Posts: 863
The magic of a Brillo pad.

Although, I'd be worried that the wood is now unprotected and over time will result in the oils from your fingers and hand absorbing into the wood without having the protective finish on it. Unless you're not sanding all of it off and just scratching the gloss.

And those are the sexiest pants I've ever seen Jay.
To start with the pants, those are swim shorts.

In fact I'm just scratching or breaking the top layer. If I'd remove the paint, I'd oil the wood. That's what I do with rosewood fingerboards too.
Ya know Jay, washing your hands might help. The THC makes everything sticky ;p
Quote:
Ya know Jay, washing your hands might help. The THC makes everything sticky ;p
Nope, my hands are always as dry as a desert. Btw, I don't smoke at all.
I was referring to me Keep the rocking vids coming
Quote:
I was referring to me Keep the rocking vids coming
Marko1960
Posts: 2174
Grey Scotchbrite pad, Bosh, will need to repeat though as neck will go glossy again with playing
Do you put another layer af laquer on after scuffing it, or are you just taking off the top layer of finish. Do you treat it after? Oil it? Thanks
I don't put another layer of laquer on. I just leave it the way it is. Because of sliding along the neck with the fretting hand, the roughened surface will more or less turn glossy again. the procedure can then be repeated. Each time only a few micron of paint comes off, so it'll take a lifetime (if not longer) to totally remove the paint.

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