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Tab adjustment

just3boyz
Posts: 178
Hey guys,
for any of you that care i want to make an adjustment to a tab on intervals i posted a while back.
i added a good amount of stuff to it so i wanted to see if you guys think what i'm adding is good or to much.
here's my adjustment:
Tabs:
This tab is a follow up to my intervals tab.
I noticed after looking it over,
I didn't really show any way of applying intervals.

As i mentioned in the first intervals tab,
most scales are made up of some kind of: 1,2,3,4,5,6 and 7

the major scale has: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7

Here's the C major scale:

|C D E F |G A B C |C B A G |F E D C |
|1 2 3 4 |5 6 7 1 |1 7 6 5 |4 3 2 1 |
G|----------------|----2---4---5---|5---4---2-------|----------------|
D|--------2---3---|5---------------|------------5---|3---2-----------|
A|3---5-----------|----------------|----------------|--------5---3---|
E|----------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|
|1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |

In the example above we used C as our root.
However,
any of the twelve cromatic notes can be a root for a new major scale.

Here's the G major scale:

|G A B C |D E F# G |G F# E D |C B A G |
|1 2 3 4 |5 6 7 1 |1 7 6 5 |4 3 2 1 |
G|----------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|
D|----------------|----2---4---5---|5---4---2-------|----------------|
A|--------2---3---|5---------------|------------5---|3---2-----------|
E|3---5-----------|----------------|----------------|--------5---3---|
|1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |

Notice how even though the notes have changed...the intervals are the same.
that's cuz no matter what major scale it is...the intervals are the same.
That means that not one major scale has all of the same notes.

The major scale is the only scale that has the intervals:1,2,3,4,5,6,7
most other scales are some kind of altered version of this scale.

for example)

the lydian scale is pretty much the same thing...with one exception!

it has a sharp 4 (#4) instead of a perfect 4th (4)

Here's the C lydian scale:

|C D E F# |G A B C |C B A G |F# E D C |
|1 2 3 #4 |5 6 7 1 |1 7 6 5 |#4 3 2 1 |
G|----------------|----2---4---5---|5---4---2-------|----------------|
D|--------2---4---|5---------------|------------5---|4---2-----------|
A|3---5-----------|----------------|----------------|--------5---3---|
E|----------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|
|1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |

If you take a look at the C lydian scale and the G major scale,
you'll notice that they have the same notes. (not the same intervals)
that's cuz the C lydian scale is a mode of the G major scale.

If you don't know what a mode is,
it's play any major scale but starting on a different note in the scale.
In this case, we started on C which is the 4th note of the G major scale.
this makes the lydian scale the 4th mode of any major scale.

keep in mind that modes have different intervals than their parent scales.
this is because they need to have the same notes.
if the intervals of both scales were the same,
then they wouldn't be modes of each other cuz they wouldn't have the same notes.
make sense?

As i stated in the first intervals tab,
just because the interval name has a sharp (#) or flat (b),
does not mean that the note name has a sharp or flat.

here's what i'm trying to say:

Db lydian scale:

|Db Eb F G |Ab Bb C Db |Db C Bb Ab |G F Eb Db |
|1 2 3 #4 |5 6 7 1 |1 7 6 5 |#4 3 2 1 |
G|----------------|----3---5---6---|6---5---3-------|----------------|
D|--------3---4---|6---------------|------------6---|4---3-----------|
A|4---6-----------|----------------|----------------|--------6---4---|
E|----------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|
|1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + |

notice that although there is a sharp 4 (#4) the G is not a G#.
here's why:

a perfect 4th (4) is 5 half steps (frets) away from the root.
Gb is 5 half steps away from Db and is the perfect 4th of Db

a sharp 4 (#4) is 6 half steps (frets) away from the root.
G is 6 half steps away from Db and is the sharp 4th of Db

again just because an interval has a sharp of flat,
does not mean that note will have a sharp or flat.

I hope this has been helpful.
Message me for any questions.
Thanks,

Connor Larkin

here's the original tab that's already up:

http://www.bigbasstabs.com/bass_lessons_bass_tabs/intervals_follow_up.html

i'd love to hear your guys thoughts.
i'm really not sure if what i added is good or not.
lemme know.
thanks,
-just3boyz
johnny [staff]
Posts: 899
you can easily edit the tabs you submitted yourself. Go to your profile, find the tab and click edit
Marko1960
Posts: 2174
I thought the intervals in the Major scale were, Root, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. For instance,
A, B, c#, D, E, F#, G#, A
Marko1960
Posts: 2174
….and you do know that B to C and E to F are half steps not whole steps?
just3boyz
Posts: 178
i figured out how i can edit my tabs johnny.
just wanted to see if what i was going to add to my tab was going to help it or make it worse.
i posted this on the forum so you guys could compare the two and give me some feed back.

marko,
that is how you figure out the major scale stepwise. (the example of A major was totally correct.)
thats how they teach you the major scale when you first take theory classes.
however eventually they teach you intervals and each intervals have certain names.
instead of just labeling how to get to each note in the major scale,
i was trying to explain that each note in any scale has it's own distance.
for example C to G (a perfect fifth or just 5) is 7 halfsteps away or a whole step, a whole step, a half step and a whole step.

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